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View Full Version : Mets Sign Japanese "Greg Maddux"


Duque
12-05-2001, 11:54 AM
I wasn't aware Greg Maddux had a career losing record, which Komiyama apparently does. This guy sounds more like the Japanese Jeff Suppan.

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http://espn.go.com/mlb/news/2001/1201/1288273.html

NEW YORK -- The "Japanese Greg Maddux" is coming to America.

Satoru Komiyama, a seven-time All-Star in Japan, has signed a one-year, $500,000 contract with the New York Mets. The right-hander has an option for 2003.

"We think Satoru can help us as a starter or out of the bullpen," Mets general manager Steve Phillips said. "Over there he is known as the `Japanese Greg Maddux.' He has tremendous control and works both sides of the plate. He rarely falls behind in the count."

The 36-year-old Komiyama was 12-9 with a 3.03 ERA in 24 games for the Yokohama BayStars of the Japanese Professional Central League last season. In 148 2/3 innings, he allowed 150 hits and 30 walks.

"Satoru really throws four pitches," Mets assistant general manager Omar Minaya said. "He has a fastball, curve, change and cutter and has command of all of them. Satoru is an experienced pitcher who will be able to help our staff in a variety of different ways."

The 6-foot-2, 195-pound Komiyama played for New York manager Bobby Valentine and would be the Mets second Japanese player. Outfielder Tsuyoshi Shinjo was a solid contributor in 2001, his first season with New York.

His best season came in 1995 with Lotte, whose manager was Valentine. Komiyama went 11-4 with a 2.60 ERA.

"He will be a welcome addition to our staff," Valentine said.

Seattle's Ichiro Suzuki, a seven-time batting champion in Japan made a huge impact in his first season in the United States, capturing Rookie of the Year and Most Valuable Player honors.

Skipper Steve
12-05-2001, 11:56 AM
Typical Met Super Hype.

"Generation J" will soon follow.

:stinker:

Yogi#8Fan
12-05-2001, 12:46 PM
Anyone know the size of the ballparks in Japan? Are the rules similar to MLB rules? I figure 12-9 isn't so good but his ERA is pretty good. I wouldn't call this Greg Maddux numbers, since Greg's best year seemed to be 1995, when he was 19-2, 1.63, but that's just a few stats from b-r.com.

The hype also might've been better had he been 26, not 36.

I think it's a wise idea to get pitchers from Japan, since the USA pool will have people in $ fights over the same pitchers, whether starters or relievers.

Duque
12-06-2001, 07:58 PM
I am truly disappointed we haven't heard from Buzz on this.

Okay, I will give the Mets some credit - they're likely to use him as a 4th or 5th reliever rather than one of their regular starters. But, honestly, how many relievers does Steve Phillips need?

If I wanted a Japanese player, I would've waited til next year when Kazuo "Godzilla" Matsui was available. There's also another Matsui (Hideo, maybe?) who's a pretty good hitter and plays short that might want to join a U.S. team. Do the Mets have an opening at short?

satchel
12-06-2001, 08:13 PM
For the Mets' sake, I hope the "Japanese Greg Maddux" turns out to be a better pitcher than the "Japanese Nolan Ryan." Not that Irabu was awful; he was halfway decent, but the Nolan Ryan comparison seems pretty comical with hindsight.

Skipper Steve
12-06-2001, 09:46 PM
Originally posted by satchel
Not that Irabu was awful; he was halfway decent, but the Nolan Ryan comparison seems pretty comical with hindsight.

Irabu and Nolan Ryan have many things in common. Neither has even been to the moon. They both have the letter "a" in their last name. Ryan would ride an exercise bike every day - even when he pitched. Irabu would walk by an exercise bike every day on his way to the crapper - even on days when he pitched. I can see how people would very easily make the connection.

sweaver
12-06-2001, 11:22 PM
Originally posted by Skipper Steve


Irabu and Nolan Ryan have many things in common. Neither has even been to the moon. They both have the letter "a" in their last name. Ryan would ride an exercise bike every day - even when he pitched. Irabu would walk by an exercise bike every day on his way to the crapper - even on days when he pitched. I can see how people would very easily make the connection.

OK, Skipper, this is on topic exactly how?

Oh, OK, so it's funny.

Yeah, 12-9 doesn't make a very good comparison to Maddux, does it?

Japanese parks are a little smaller than here, the pitchers tend to rely more on breaking balls and control, but the rules of the game are basically the same. Japanese ball is roughly comparable to AAA ball here. That's why Japanese players can still be American rookies.

BuzzBuzzard
12-07-2001, 06:57 AM
Originally posted by Duque
I am truly disappointed we haven't heard from Buzz on this.
What is there to say? I don't know diddly about this guy, Greg Maddux comparison or not. We didn't give anything up, that's good. He's 36, that's bad. I have to reserve judgement, I guess. Kind of like a non-event to me at this point. I would have prefered the Mets to make a major move which they seems likely not to do.

I didn't particularly care for the 'typical Mets super hype' comment, because all teams do it, so to single out the Mets was nothing short of a provocation, but not worth arguing over.

Yogi#8Fan
12-08-2001, 05:47 PM
In the end, 36 isn't totally bad. The 2001 NL CYA winner is 38, the AL CYA winner is 39 (let's not get into worthiness) and Satchel Paige was about 42 when he entered MLB from the Negro Leagues.

If this guy can pitch, doesn't tip his pitches, we'll see. I guess he'll be schooled by Leiter the way Bruce Chen was, especially sine Bruce is a LHP like Al, while Satoru is a RHP.

RichG
12-08-2001, 09:01 PM
Are you saying Chen was 'schooled' by Leiter because he's Japanese or just because he was a pitcher on the same staff? I was wondering because Chen's of Panamanian descent, despite the last name. :-)

Originally posted by Yogi#8Fan

If this guy can pitch, doesn't tip his pitches, we'll see. I guess he'll be schooled by Leiter the way Bruce Chen was, especially sine Bruce is a LHP like Al, while Satoru is a RHP.

Skipper Steve
12-08-2001, 09:10 PM
Originally posted by RichG
Are you saying Chen was 'schooled' by Leiter because he's Japanese or just because he was a pitcher on the same staff? I was wondering because Chen's of Panamanian descent, despite the last name.

Rich - I think this is just another case of Yog being Yog - - many of his posts leave some with a :confuse2: look on their face. It's bizarre to think that a 36-year old, who was a 7 time All-Star in Japan, would need the same advice on pitching that 24 year old trying to find himself pitcher could use.

:rolleyes:

Yogi#8Fan
12-08-2001, 10:19 PM
Originally posted by RichG
Are you saying Chen was 'schooled' by Leiter because he's Japanese or just because he was a pitcher on the same staff? I was wondering because Chen's of Panamanian descent, despite the last name. :-)Chen was schooled by Leiter since both are lefties. It was some article in the NY Post or NY Daily News which said that Chen, who came in on the Butch Reed/Matt Lawton trade. Chen took to Leiter the same way Andy took to Roger on the Yanks. I don't see nationality as an issue there, since in the end, they're playing on the same diamond.

Yogi#8Fan
12-08-2001, 10:20 PM
Originally posted by Skipper Steve
Rich - I think this is just another case of Yog being Yog - - many of his posts leave some with a :confuse2: look on their face. It's bizarre to think that a 36-year old, who was a 7 time All-Star in Japan, would need the same advice on pitching that 24 year old trying to find himself pitcher could use.

:rolleyes: Yeah, I love you too.